A Call To All Bronxites

 

thIf you’re a Bronxite and you are concerned with the issues affecting your borough you need to make time and attend this important community forum taking place this Saturday. A few hours of your time can contribute to a lifetime of positive change for a community that has been screaming for change.

 On Saturday, December 5, 2015, the Bronx Chapter of the Campaign for Fair Latino Representation (CFLR) will hold its first Latino Policy Forum.  The purpose of the Forum is to design a Progressive Latino Policy Agenda for the residents of the borough.  The Bronx is home to 741,000 Hispanics (2010 US Census), more than any other borough.

Organizers of the Forum point out that despite some progress in recovering from the worst days of the 1970s and 1980s the Bronx still has a long way to go.  It remains the poorest urban county in the United States, and suffers from high levels of unemployment, poverty and poor health indicators.  Not surprisingly, the Bronx, particularly areas of the South Bronx has also been targeted by real estate developers for gentrification. This is occurring in areas where the community has been organizing and working to fortify itself and develop comeback strategies.

The forum will have several workshops addressing many of the issues affecting the South Bronx community. The workshops results will be made part of a citywide Latino Policy Agenda that will help to address the concerns of a Latino community that many believe has been ignored by the present city hall administration

WHAT: Forum to design a Progressive Latino Policy Agenda

WHEN: Saturday December 5th, 2015

TIME: 9:30am registration & coffee. 10am Start. It will end at 1pm.

WHERE: Resurrection United Methodist Church                                                                                                        790 Elton Avenue (Corner of 156st) Bronx, 10451

12279244_10208420763295892_6501097571414483641_n

—————————————————————————————————Among the sponsors and workshop presenters are well-known community activists and leaders, including Ramón Jiménez, Wanda Salaman, Ismael Betancourt, Julio Pabón, Rev. Carmen Hernández, Frank García, Julio Muñoz and others. They will facilitate a process of agenda-building toward a vision of the future.